Struck-off psychotherapist caught impersonating abuse victim

Readers of this blog will be familiar with the story of Ray Holland, the psychotherapist who was struck off by the UK Council for Psychotherapy in 2014 for serious sexual misconduct with a vulnerable client. Since then he has changed his name to Ray Bott-Holland and carried on practising, registering with a string of impressive-sounding but non-accredited bodies. Along the way, he’s occasionally sent me spurious legal threats for having the temerity to put information in the public domain that was already in the public domain to begin with. Continue reading

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Struck-off psychotherapist makes clumsy attempt to gag social media

Former UKCP psychotherapist Ray Holland has been no stranger to this blog. You may remember him from such blog posts as, “Being struck off for serious sexual misconduct with a vulnerable client.” You may also remember him from, “Changing his name to Ray Bott-Holland, signing up with various impressive-sounding but non-accredited organisations, and carrying on practising.” And let’s not forget his mini-viral Internet sensation, “Phil Doré, I’m going to sue you if you don’t take down your blog posts.”

After I broadcast his spurious legal threats across half of Twitter, I never heard from him again. Until today.

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When does sexual attraction turn into sexual misconduct?

Given that I’ve blogged about serious sexual misconduct cases in counselling and psychotherapy, @sameihuda on Twitter drew my attention to this article in BPS Research Digest. It deals with the tricky topic of when therapists develop a sense of sexual attraction to their clients.

The article refers only to when therapists have sexual feelings, not when this turns into actual sexual acts (fortunately, none of the therapists surveyed in the research cited had done this). I’ll give some thoughts on when this could happen.

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I get a legal threat from a struck-off psychotherapist

Previously I commented on the case of Ray Holland, a psychotherapist who was struck off by the UK Council for Psychotherapy for serious sexual misconduct with an “evidently vulnerable client”. Mr Holland denies the allegations despite the striking-off, and has returned to psychotherapy practice. This week I noticed that he had put up a new business website, changing his name to Ray Bott-Holland.

Today, I received two e-mails from Holland (or Bott-Holland, or whatever he’ll be calling himself next week) threatening to sue me if I don’t remove all his details from my blog.

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Struck-off psychotherapist rebrands himself

In July 2014 Raymond Holland was struck off by the UK Council for Psychotherapy, over allegations of serious sexual misconduct with an “evidently vulnerable client”. They also allege that he “threatened Ms [Redacted] in order to prevent her from reporting the matter.” The panel found he “gave no indication at all that he had learned by his experiences or that he showed any insight into his behaviour.”

In September I noticed that he appeared to be still practising. His website was up, and he turned up in the comments thread of my blog post to confirm that he did indeed plan to continue despite his striking-off. Since then his website has gone down. But now a new website has gone up. For a Ray Bott-Holland.

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Struck-off psychotherapist still practising?

The UK Council for Psychotherapy recently struck off Raymond Spencer Holland for serious sexual misconduct with an “evidently vulnerable client.” They allege he “threatened [the client] in order to prevent her from reporting the matter” and “spoke with the absence of empathy towards [the client] whom he said he believed was ‘a fantasist’.” The UKCP found that he showed no remorse or insight into his actions.

But is he still practising? Web searches suggest he may well be.

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UKCP strikes off psychotherapist

Following the godawful decision by the UK Council for Psychotherapy to impose a 6 month suspension for serious sexual misconduct (after which the therapist was allowed to re-register), there’s been another hearing outcome, again involving serious sexual misconduct. This time however, the registrant has been struck off.

Obviously, that represents an improvement on the terrible decision-making in the Rob Waygood case. But does it mean that the UKCP’s complaints process is becoming more robust? Personally, I’m not convinced.

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