High Court upgrades McCarron case to a striking-off

In June 2014 I was alarmed to hear that the Health and Care Professions Council had declined to strike off a clinical psychologist who had committed serious sexual misconduct with someone who had recently been in therapy with him. Despite John McCarron not even turning up to the hearing, he was issued with a one-year suspension instead.

The Professional Standards Authority subsequently appealed the decision to the High Court. Today I’m pleased to hear that the High Court has upheld the appeal (see page 6) and ordered that McCarron be struck off. Continue reading

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McCarron case referred to High Court

In May 2014 the Health and Care Professions Council made a heavily-criticised decision not to strike off a clinical psychologist who had been found to have committed serious sexual misconduct. John McCarron was instead given a one-year suspension.

The Professional Standards Authority has now referred the decision to the High Court. The hearing will be on 22nd January 2015. I’m pleased that such a highly-questionable outcome will receive further scrutiny.

More on the McCarron case

Last month I was alarmed to hear that the Health and Care Professions Council had failed to strike off a practitioner psychologist after finding allegations of serious sexual misconduct proved. The full committee findings are now online. I think it raises a few questions about how the panel came to its decision.

John McCarron, a psychologist from Lancashire. was suspended for a year after beginning a sexual relationship with a vulnerable client shortly after the therapy ended. I’ve chatted about the case on Twitter with various psychologists, all of whom have been shaking their heads at what looks like a worryingly lenient decision. I received a few thoughts from Leigh Emery about the sanction. Continue reading

Psychologist has sex with client, is not struck off by @The_HCPC

I’ve covered various cases where psychotherapy bodies have dealt with therapists who’ve committed serious sexual misconduct by temporarily suspending them rather than permanently striking them off. These have included shocking cases such as Geoffrey Pick, Stuart Macfarlane and Rob Waygood.

There’s a new name to add to this rogue’s gallery, but this time there’s a difference. I’ve argued that such cases mean that counselling and psychotherapy needs to dispense with voluntary self-regulation in favour of a statutory regulator such as the Health and Care Professions Council. However, on this occasion it’s the HCPC themselves who have decided that having sex with a client is not a reason to strike somebody off. Continue reading